Screen_Shot_2012-12-12_at_3.36.07_PMScreen_Shot_2012-12-12_at_3.59.55_PM 
Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon

 

West End / Washington Corridor

The West End has been a designated area of Houston since the early 1900s, referring to the areas west of Downtown out to Memorial Park, along what we now call the Washington Corridor. Rice Military has become the centerpiece of this area, but other neighborhoods include Camp Logan, Crestwood, Glen Cove, Woodcrest, Cottage Grove, Magnolia Grove, Memorial Heights, Sawyer Heights (First Ward) and the Sixth Ward. In the 1980s, builders started purchasing dilapidated homes in the Rice Military area that were the remnants of Army barracks for enlisted troops in the WWI era, when the Army trained in what is now Memorial Park. In their place rose townhome after townhome, starting gentrification of the Washington Corridor, which now hosts high end properties ranging from $400,000 to $6 million. Tucked up against Memorial Park, Camp Logan – the previous location of the Army’s officer’s homes – hosts the higher end townhomes, while Crestwood and Glen Cove rival Houston’s finest neighborhoods with pricing in the $1-6 million range. The average price for an average 2,500 SF townhome built 1980+ in the West End in 2013 was $475,000 ($185/SF). This include sales from the high end Spanish village inspired community of Caceres, where prices exceed $1 million.


Memorial Area

The Memorial Area has 3 distinct components – Close In Memorial (Chimney Rock to 610), the Memorial Villages (Hunters Creek, Piney Point, Bunker Hill and Hedwig), and West Memorial (Gessner west to Hwy 6). Close In Memorial and the Villages have some of Houston’s finest and most expensive homes, mostly on half acre to one acre lots with mature trees. This is a major draw for Houston’s professionals, executives and athletes and their families, who enjoy the best of the best schools in the Spring Branch ISD. The pricing in these areas of Memorial in 2013 ranged from $600,000 to $5 million, with an average price of $1,690,000 ($327/SF) for a 4/3, 5,200 SF house on over a half acre lot. Construction started in the mid 1950s, but new construction has remained strong over the years due to the rapid appreciation and large lot sizes. Memorial Area sales have been bolstered by the expansion of the nearby Energy Corridor and explosion of high paying jobs in the area.




Bellaire

Founded in the early 1900’s on what was originally William Marsh Rice’s (Rice University founder) ranch, Bellaire was originally an agricultural trading center. It soon became a residential area and was connected to Main Street in Downtown by a trolley.


This now highly populated residential area just south of the Galleria and west of the Medical Center, has four parks and is made up of the neighborhoods of Bellaire Place, Bellaire Oaks, Pin Oak Estates, Mulberry Manor, Southdale and Westmoreland Farms to name a few. There are three private schools and the public schools are in the Houston Independent School District. Bellaire’s government is made up of a mayor and six city council members.


The population is around 20,000 and over 60% of their residents are married with children living at home. The average age of the population is a 29. The average home is 41 years old, but with all of the new construction being built that number is rapidly decreasing. The average home price was valued at $232,900 for 2012, according to the Houston Association of Realtors. They also show 72 properties available in 77401 as of our press deadline and 32 were listed for more than a million asking price, so that average property price is sure to rise.


Heights

anssThe Heights is home to many of Houston’s oldest homes built in the 1800’s. Many have been torn down, but some of the architecture from that century can still be seen in the new houses being built. The Heights officially began in 1892 with a streetcar linking it to downtown Houston. In 1917 the Heights was annexed by the City of Houston.

The Heights is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and boasts over 100 structures on their list. Many of the Houston’s historic districts are there including the Houston Heights South, East and West Historic Districts. On the har.com website there is a tool to help locate these districts. The Houston Heights Association was formed in the seventies and created the Lights in the Heights annual celebration along with a permanent Victorian rose garden. The Heights has been arguably the most active and sought out markets for homebuyers and builders. Consequently, prices have increased dramatically in the last few years.


Memorial Area

The Memorial area has 3 distinct components – Close In Memorial (Chimney Rock to 610), the Memorial Villages (Hunters Creek, Piney Point, Bunker Hill and Hedwig), and West Memorial (Gessner west to Hwy 6). Close In Memorial and the Villages have some of Houston’s finest and most expensive homes, mostly on half acre to one acre lots with mature trees. This is a major draw for Houston’s professionals, executives and athletes and their families, who prefer schools in the Spring Branch ISD. The pricing in these areas of Memorial in 2013 ranged from $600,000 to $5 million, with an average price of $1,690,000 ($327/SF) for a 4/3, 5,200 SF house on over a half acre lot. Construction started in the mid 1950s, but new construction has remained strong over the years due to the rapid appreciation and large lot sizes. Memorial area sales have been bolstered by the expansion of the nearby Energy Corridor and explosion of high paying jobs in the area.


Montrose/Museum District

Considered one of the most interesting areas of Houston, Montrose is an eclectic arrangement of tattoo parlors, tarot readers, churches, cafes, nice restaurants, coffee shops, junk shops and vintage clothing boutiques. It is in many ways the core of the inner city of Houston. The neighborhood abuts the sprawling Museum District now home to a dozen museums with The Holocaust and The Asia Center Texas being the newest additions to this thriving cultural arts scene. Only a hop and a skip from the Museum District lies the Texas Medical Center, the world’s largest, which houses the famed Texas Children’s Hospital and MD Anderson Cancer Center. The Metro light rail runs through the Museum District and connects with downtown Houston and the Medical Center and Reliant Park. With the proximity of all these important and interesting landmarks and the divergence of cultures this area has become one of the most desirable for newcomers to the city. Prices in this area have been on the rise due to new townhomes, custom building and commercial real estate development.


River Oaks/Upper Kirby

River_OaksIn the heart of Houston is one of its most beautiful and opulent neighborhoods. River Oaks is a relatively small area of around 1,300 homes, anchored by Houston’s most exclusive country club. There are estates priced as high as $14 million and homes are priced in the $400/sq ft range depending on the size of the lots. Established in the 1920’s, this is the most expensive neighborhood in Texas and one of the richest in the US. Situated in the center of Houston, equal distance to the Galleria, the Medical Center and downtown, its neighborhoods include Avalon Place, Royden Oaks, Kettering Oaks, Afton Oaks, Oak Estates and Highland Village. In the center of these neighborhoods are Lamar High School and the private St. John’s School as well as the venerable River Oaks Country Club and The Briar Club. Also home to the magnificent four acre Rienzi, part of the Museum of Fine Arts. This area also hosts the annual Azalea Trail sponsored by the River Oaks Garden Club. Upper Kirby abuts River Oaks and provides some of Houston’s finest dining and shopping to accommodate the taste of River Oaks’ wealthy residents. Upper Kirby is going through a facelift, with power lines being buried under ground and roads being reworked to bear the heavier traffic due to the high end townhomes and hi-rise condos and apartments that have sprouted up in recent years.


Tanglewood

Not to be outclassed by neighboring River Oaks, this relatively newer neighborhood was started in the 1940’s on rural farmland. With the sparkling shopping mecca, the Galleria in their backyard, the roughly 1,200 Tanglewood homeowners can claim a median appraised value at just over a one million dollars. Lots range in size from 8,000 sq ft to two plus acres and many still have the ranch style homes. As to be expected during the recent boom, many of the older ranch homes have been replaced by new larger Mediterranean or contemporary homes. Some of the nearby subdivisions include Briargrove, Pine Shadows, Briarcroft, Indian Trail, Lamar Terrace and Larchmont.


West End / Washington Corridor

The West End has been a designated area of Houston since the early 1900s, referring to the areas west of Downtown out to Memorial Park, along what we now call the Washington Corridor. Rice Military has become the centerpiece of this area, but other neighborhoods include Camp Logan, Crestwood, Glen Cove, Woodcrest, Cottage Grove, Magnolia Grove, Memorial Heights, Sawyer Heights (First Ward) and the Sixth Ward. In the 1980s, builders started purchasing dilapidated homes in the Rice Military area that were the remnants of US Army barracks for enlisted troops in the WWI era, when the Army trained in what is now Memorial Park. In their place rose townhome after townhome, starting gentrification of the Washington Corridor, which now hosts high end properties ranging from $400,000 to $6 million. The average price for an average 2,500 SF townhome built 1980+ in the West End in 2013 was $475,000 ($185/SF). This includes sales from the high end Spanish village inspired community of Caceres, where prices exceed $1 million.


West University

West_UFounded in 1912, the City of West University is a city within the City of Houston that has its own unique appeal and amenities, including a fabulous recreation center only for West U residents. With roughly a mix of approximately 1,200 older and newer homes, the average price of a home sold in 2013 was $800,000 or $300/sq ft. Good schools, strong neighborhood associations, and proximity to the Medical Center, Rice University and Rice Village are some of the draws for the residents of West U, which includes the neighborhoods of Pemberton Place, Belle Court, Monticello, Virginia Court, College View, College Court and Sunset Terrace.